Recent Articles

18 Feb 2015

Learning what no one meant to teach

by Michael Ward | Issue 113

I WAS AT FOUR SCHOOLS  and learnt nothing at three of them.”

Thus Lewis spoke of his education during the period 1908 to 1914, between the ages of 9 (when he ceased being homeschooled) and 15 (when he began to be privately tutored). Even if we allow for hyperbole, it was still a damning verdict on the education he received during some of his most formative years. Much has been written about Lewis’s time studying...

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18 Feb 2015

The storyteller

by Kirstin Jeffrey Johnson | Issue 113

ONCE UPON A TIME  . . .  a long time ago—though not so long as you might suspect—there was a man who believed that stories must be told. For after all, he knew that was what had happened in the beginning: stories were told. Once upon a time . . . a long time ago, stories changed the world forever: in the beginning; in the days of Caesar Augustus; and ever since. 

And so this man told stories too: some were of real...

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18 Feb 2015

Friends, warriors, sages

by the editors with Alister McGrath, Chrystal Downing, Colin Duriez | Issue 113

Why are these seven sages still around? Why do people still read their books, talk about their ideas, and debate their influence? Christian History sat down with three experts who have written widely about these authors to probe the ways in which they still speak to us today.
Crystal Downing is Distinguished Professor of English and Film Studies at Messiah College (PA) and writes on the relationship between...

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18 Feb 2015

A Christian revolutionary?

by Suzanne Bray | Issue 113

IN THE EARLY to mid-twentieth century, the world was in crisis. The consequences of World War I had been economically disastrous. Politically the unsatisfactory peace settlement in 1919 led to the emergence of totalitarian regimes in Italy, Spain, and Germany, led by men whose names have echoed through the decades: Franco, Mussolini, Hitler. By 1939 the arrival of new conflict was hardly a surprise.

Meanwhile the...

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18 Feb 2015

The forgotten Inkling

by Edwin Woodruff Tait | Issue 113

THE GRACIOUS ENGLISH BOOKSTORE CLERK had not heard of Owen Barfield. His early, groundbreaking work of literary criticism, Poetic Diction , didn’t ring any bells. Nor did his masterpiece, Saving the Appearances . I didn’t mention his children’s fantasy, The Silver Trumpet , or his whimsical autobiographical novel, This Ever Diverse Pair , dividing the two sides of his life into two separate individuals—stolid lawyer...

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17 Nov 2014

Another stop on the glory train?

by Jerry L. Walls | Issue 112

The most famous WORK ever written about heaven, of course, is Dante’s Divine Comedy. Only its third book, however, is explicitly about heaven: Paradiso . Ironically, even more famous than Paradiso is Inferno , Dante’s colorful account of hell. 

Heaven and hell are like salt and pepper, or better yet, good and evil, or Batman and the Joker. After all, right in the middle of the most glorious account of heaven in the...

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