Christian History Institute

Sharing our story of faith across the ages

items tagged with martin luther

Timeline

Study Modules

Productions

DVDs

  • This Changed Everything

    2016

    This Changed Everything: 500 Years of the Reformation celebrates the fruits of the Reformation while exploring difficult questions about the cost of division: Could schism have been avoided? Is there hope for reunification? What did Jesus really mean when He prayed for His followers to be "one"?

    In this visually rich, three-part documentary series hosted by actor David Suchet, leading church historians share fascinating insights and pose vital questions about unity, truth, and the future of the Christian church.

    Among the experts featured in this series are Dr. Frank James, Dr. John Armstrong, Dr. Michael Horton, Dr. Jacqueline Rose, Bishop Robert Barron, Mark Galli, Dr. Joel Harrington, Shane Claiborne, Dr. Karin Maag, Dr. Scott Kisker, and many others.

    Bonus material on Disc 2: Over five hours of interviews with experts, virtual tours of key Reformation sites, companion guide in PDF. An interactive guide is also available at www.ThisChangedEverything.com/companion guide. 

    Learn More

  • The Reformation Overview

    1995

    The Reformation Overview is a set adapted from six films which between them have won over thirty prestigious international film awards. Included are Wycliffe, Hus, Zwingli, Luther, Calvin, the Sattlers, and Tyndale.

    Learn More

Magazine Issues

Articles

15 Aug 2007

The Gospel Truth

by Mark Noll | Issue 95

Luther wrote six hymns to be sung as part of his instruction in the catechism, which was his simple but powerful explanation of the Ten Commandments, the Apostles’ Creed, the Lord’s Prayer, Baptism, and the Lord’s Supper.

When he preached on the Lord’s Prayer, for example, the congregation also sang the hymn he wrote that paraphrased and expanded each of the prayer’s petitions. Luther’s explanation of the final “amen” echoed his instruction from the Small Catechism about what the believer should do after saying a final evening prayer (“Then...

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19 May 2016

Allies or Enemies?

by Robert D. Linder | Issue 118

From our vantage point 500 years later, Protestant reformers may all look the same: men and women fighting in one accord to birth a new church. But nothing could be further from the truth. In addition to his papal opponents, Martin Luther soon began to believe that his fellow reformers threatened true renewal of the church. Labeling them “false brethren” and “fanatics,” he fought like a tiger to preserve doctrine he believed God had revealed to him. 

In, With, and Under

The sharpest clash came over the meaning of the Eucharist. Swiss...

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21 Nov 2015

The straw that broke the camel’s back

by Eric W. Gritsch | Issue 116

ON OCTOBER 31, 1517 , the day before the Feast of All Saints, 33-year-old Martin Luther posted theses against the practice of indulgences on the door of the Castle Church in Wittenberg. (At least, so wrote Philip Melancthon after Luther’s death.) The door functioned as a bulletin board for announcements related to academic and church affairs. Whether or not Luther put the theses on the door, he certainly mailed them off that day to his superiors with an annoyed note. 

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20 Aug 2015

Recommended Resources

by The editors | Issue 115

Books

• Since this is our first of four issues on the Reformation, we’ll start with some survey histories. (A more complete list is available in our blog post dated July 5, 2014). The most magisterial of these is probably Diarmaid MacCulloch’s Reformation: A History (2003), a massive work that goes from 1490 to 1700 and covers all aspects of many reform movements across Europe. Some other classics include Hans Hillerbrand’s The Division of Christendom (2007; it has extensive coverage of the theological issues at stake); Euan Cameron’s The...

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19 Aug 2015

Preachers, popes, and princes

by David C. Steinmetz and Paul Thigpen | Issue 115

JOHANNES STAUPITZ (c. 1460–1524)

Johannes Staupitz was Luther’s superior in the Augustinian order, his predecessor in the chair of Bible at the University of Wittenberg, and his adviser in an especially critical period of theological development.

Staupitz was one of a long line of theologians in the late Middle Ages who protested in the name of Augustine the direction that the church was taking in its interpretation of the Gospel. The Reformation was a continuation of that protest, even though the form was somewhat different and the content...

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19 Aug 2015

Did You Know?

by the editors and others | Issue 115

Michelangelo, music, and Mass

  • Christopher Columbus set sail when Luther was a schoolboy, and Michelangelo was completing his Sistine Chapel ceiling when Luther began teaching theology as a young man.
  • Luther preferred music to any other school subject, and he became very skilled at playing the lute. Upon becoming a monk at age 21, he had to give the lute away.
  • When Luther celebrated his first Mass as a priest in 1507, he trembled so much he nearly dropped the bread and cup. He was so terrified of the presence of Christ in the sacrament that...

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19 Aug 2015

What did Luther know and when did he know it?

by Edwin Woodruff Tait | Issue 115

In 1545 the elderly Luther reluctantly authorized the publication of his collected Latin works. In its preface he told of his second course of lectures on the Psalms, given in 1519, a tense and dramatic year (see p. 17). Against its stormy backdrop, Luther approached the Psalms for the second time. But this time, he recalled, he was “armed” with a discovery that gave him a new understanding of the meaning of Scripture. (Luther’s casual comment to his friends in 1532 that the insight had occurred “on this cloaca [toilet]” has fascinated...

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19 Aug 2015

After the revolution

by Mark U. Edwards Jr. | Issue 115

Martin Luther spent the early years of the Reformation battling the Roman Catholic establishment. But it wasn’t long before the fledgling movement was battling itself. In the mid-1520s Luther was forced to respond to the first major splits within the Protestant ranks. He faced a popular uprising known as the Peasants’ War. At the peak of the uprising, expecting imminent death, Luther decided to further break with tradition: he married. Then he became increasingly involved in building what became Lutheranism. And in his final years,...

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19 Aug 2015

Editor’s note

by Jennifer Woodruff Tait | Issue 115

When I was much younger, and in graduate school at Duke University, I decided to drop a class. (This does happen, even in graduate school.) I had to decide on a class to take in its place and was going over the course schedule with my mother on the phone. (This also happens sometimes, even in graduate school.) I mentioned that Duke offered a class on Luther. “Oh, you should take that one,” she said. “That’s where we all started.” By we she meant Protestant we .

I did take the class, entering with the picture many of us have in our heads: a...

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19 Aug 2015

The political Luther

by Lewis W. Spitz | Issue 115

During the Schmalkaldic War, which broke out after Martin Luther’s death, Catholic Spanish troops defeated Protestant German princes and overran much of German Saxony, including Wittenberg. When the Spanish soldiers stood at Luther’s grave in the Castle Church, they demanded that Luther’s body be exhumed and his bones burned as heretic’s bones. But Emperor Charles V stopped them. He is said to have declared: “I do not make war on dead men!”

This story seems to be a golden legend, but it shows the passions Luther aroused. The Reformation was...

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18 Aug 2015

Momentous vows

by Beth Kreitzer | Issue 115

On June 13, 1525, 41-year-old Martin Luther and Katharine von Bora, 15 years his junior, married in Wittenberg after a brief engagement of less than a day. It was a union that shocked a nation—not because of their age difference, but because the couple was, in the eyes of the medieval church, committing incest.

As a former monk and a former nun, the two had been “brother” and “sister,” even if only in a spiritual sense. Popular opinion held that such a union could only result in a “monstrous birth,” most likely of the Antichrist—a sure sign...

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18 Aug 2015

Christ present everywhere

by David C. Steinmetz | Issue 115

Who was Jesus, and what could he have meant to imply about himself when, as the Gospel of Matthew reports, he broke bread and told his disciples to “take, eat, this is my body”? Early Protestants were fairly certain they knew what Jesus did not mean: to suggest that bread and wine had been miraculously “transubstantiated” into his physical body and blood. The word “transubstantiation,” the medieval Catholic understanding of Christ’s presence in the Eucharist, rests on a distinction between the substance of a thing (what it really is) and...

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18 Aug 2015

“Contemplate Christ”

by Timothy George | Issue 115

One day in 1511, Luther and his monastic mentor, Johannes Staupitz, sat under a pear tree in a garden near their cloister at Wittenberg.

The vicar-general of the Augustinian order told young Luther he should become a professor of theology and a preacher. Luther was taken aback. “It will be the death of me!” he objected. “Quite all right,” said Staupitz. “God has plenty of work for clever men like you to do in heaven!”

Luther did receive his doctor’s degree—just over a year later, on October 18, 1512. That day he also received a woolen...

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18 Aug 2015

The accidental revolutionary

by James M. Kittleson | Issue 115

AN ADVISER TO SIXTEENTH-CENTURY tourists remarked that people who returned from their travels without having seen Martin Luther and the pope “have seen nothing.” Another man read Luther’s works and declared, “The Church has never seen a greater heretic!” But upon reflection he exclaimed, “He alone is right!”

How could one person evoke such conflicting reactions echoing through the centuries? Luther himself said, “Others before me have contested practice. But to contest doctrine, that is to grab the goose by the neck!” Luther’s childhood...

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15 May 2005

Luther: The Daily Gift of New Life

by Martin E. Marty | Issue 86

"ARE YOU BORN AGAIN?” Bill Moyers asked me in 1976 for a television program on a term that most Americans were first learning. My answer: “Yes.” When? February 26, 1928. Moyers, “You don’t look old enough for that early date?” He was thinking Baptistically; I was talking about my baptism at three weeks of age. “And that does it for life?” he asked. I answered, “'Yes’ and ‘no.’ I was also ‘born again’ this morning.”

This plunge to the heart of Luther’s theology summarizes my changed life. These lines in his Small Catechism hit me forcefully...

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15 Aug 2004

Mary & Her Baby: Luther’s View

by Martin Luther | Issue 83

ON THE WHOLE NATIVITY STORY : “We must both read and meditate upon the Nativity. . . . There is such richness and goodness in this Nativity that if we should see and deeply understand, we should be dissolved in perpetual joy. Wherefore Saint Bernard declared there are here three miracles: that God and man should be joined in this Child; that a mother should remain a virgin; that Mary should have such faith as to believe that this mystery would be accomplished in her. . . . Truly it is marvelous in our eyes that God should place a little child...

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14 Feb 2004

Turning Point: Luther’s Lost Opportunity

by Bruce Heydt | Issue 81

MARTIN LUTHER’S MIND was unshakably fixed as he sat in the great hall of the medieval castle in Marburg, Germany, on the morning of October 2, 1529.

He had come to Marburg grudgingly, at the request of the Protestant Landgrave of the German state, Philip of Hesse, who had summoned Luther and other leading German and Swiss reformers to a meeting ostensibly of great theological importance. But the real impetus for the gathering was strictly political. That underlying fact made the outcome of this “Marburg Colloquy” a foregone conclusion.

To...

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15 May 2002

From Crusades to Homeland Defense

by Gregory Miller | Issue 74

"E go usque ad mortem luctor adversus Turcas et Turcarum Deum,” Martin Luther wrote. “I will always struggle to the death against the Turks and the god of the Turks.”

Luther was not the only European of his era to fear a deadly battle with Islamic forces (i.e. Turks). During the reign of Sultan Sulaiman the Magnificent, 1520–1566, the Ottoman Empire reached its greatest geographical extent and the height of its military power. Throughout Europe pamphlets reported one Ottoman victory after another. As far away as England, the word “Turk”...

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30 Nov 2000

The Reformation Connection

by Timothy George | Issue 68

J an Hus has always been difficult to place precisely in the history of Christian thought. Does he belong to the Middle Ages or to early modern times? Is he a representative of medieval heretical dissent or a precursor of Martin Luther, John Calvin, and the sixteenth-century Reformation? Was he merely a local leader of a Czech movement or a figure of wider European significance?

Recent scholars have protested the earlier tendency to depict Hus as a mere echo of English reformer John Wyclif (whose writings he knew and quoted) or a simple...

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31 Aug 1993

A Sick Man’s Healthy Accomplishments

by the Editors | Issue 39

 

 

Health

Activity

1527

Sickly for eight months; dizzy spell during sermon in April. Threatening attacks of Anfechtungen (spiritual darkness, doubt, depression) in July, repeated in September and December. Plague epidemic in Wittenburg. 

Preaches 60 sermons; lectures; writes 100 letters and 15 tracts; works on Old Testament; takes brief trips. Daughter Elizabeth born.

1528

Rather healthy

Preaches 190 sermons; lectures; writes 150 old letters and 20 tracts; works on Old Testament; travels to Torgau and Altenburg....

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31 Aug 1993

Unstoppable

by Eric W. Gritsch | Issue 39

LUTHER’S DISEASES were caused by the way he lived rather than by genetic disposition. Years of malnutrition in the monastery, long days and nights of hard mental labor, as well as his later thorough enjoyment of food, drink, and sex had their effect on Luther’s health.

During his exile at the Wartburg, Luther was plagued by stomach disorders and constipation. “The Lord has afflicted me with painful constipation,” he told Melanchthon in May 1521. “I did not sleep all night and still have no peace. Please pray for me.”

From 1526 on, Luther...

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31 Aug 1993

Luther’s Living Legacy

by Martin E. Marty | Issue 39

Martin Luther has been called “the last medieval man and the first modern one.” Though raised in the distant medieval world, he has profoundly shaped our own. To understand better Luther’s impact on today’s church and world,  Christian History  talked with Lutheran historian Martin E. Marty, Fairfax M. Cone Distinguished Service Professor at the University of Chicago, and member of the editorial advisory board of  Christian History . Marty is author of numerous books, including, most recently, the multi-volume  Modern American...

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31 Aug 1993

Luther’s Will and Testaments

by Eugemne F.A. Klug | Issue 39

Thomas Carlyle once described Martin Luther as “great, not as a hewn obelisk, but as an Alpine mountain, so simple, honest, spontaneous, not setting up to be great at all; there for another purpose than being great at all!” That “purpose” was, in Luther’s mind, to preserve and proclaim God-given doctrine.

The thought never nested in Luther’s mind that the doctrine for which he stood was his own. “It is not my doctrine, not my creation, but God’s gift,” he declared in a 1531 sermon. “Dear Lord God, it was not spun out of my head, nor grown...

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31 Aug 1993

How I Pray

by Martin Luther | Issue 39

How should I pray? What exactly should I say? How long should I go on? Such were the questions put to Luther by his barber and lifelong friend, Peter Beskendorf. In response, Luther composed  A Simple Way to Pray, in which he showed how the Lord’s Prayer, the Ten Commandments, and the Apostles’ Creed can guide prayer. Here is an excerpt of the first two sections of Luther’s 1535 booklet .

Dear Master Peter: I will tell you as best I can what l do personally when I pray. May our dear Lord grant to you and to everybody to do it better than I!...

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31 Aug 1993

Allies or Enemies?

by Robert D. Linder | Issue 39

AS THE PROTESTANT REFORMERS began to construct their new order, it became apparent there were significant differences among them.

Martin Luther, founder of the new order, soon saw, in addition to his papal opponents on his right, a serious threat on his left: “false brethren.” These “fanatics,” as he also labeled them, held evangelical beliefs similar to Luther’s. But they differed with him on crucial issues, usually on the interpretation of the Lord’s Supper. To Luther, this group threatened the true reformation of the church.

The...

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Showing 1-25 of 70 records.

Blog Posts

16 Feb 2017

God's second best gift

|

Next to God's Word, his best gift is a pious, cheerful, God-fearing, home-keeping wife with whom you can live in peace and tranquility; to whom you can entrust your goods and body and life. --Martin Luther (as quoted in Philip Schaff, History of...

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Products

  • Return To Grace: Luther's Life and Legacy $19.99

    Return To Grace: Luther's Life and Legacy

    • DVD
    • 105 Minutes
    • Drama
    • 1
    • 2017
    • Boettcher Trinklein Television Inc

    The great drama of Martin Luther’s life comes alive in this vivid portrayal of the penniless monk’s quest for truth—a quest that would re-shape the church, and the world.

    Details
  • 500th Anniversary Commemorative Coin $34.99

    500th Anniversary Commemorative Coin

    • Other
    • Christian History Institute

    This limited edition commemorative coin recognizes the 500th anniversary of Luther’s posting the 95 theses on the Wittenburg Castle door.

    Details
  • Man Named Martin- Part 2 $11.99

    Man Named Martin- Part 2

    • DVD
    • All
    • 65 Minutes
    • Drama
    • 2016

    Witness the interplay of personalities and events that led to the Protestant Reformation. From Luther’s inner struggles of conscience and faith to his call for debate with the Pope to his scathing rebuke of erroneous church practice, this installment examines the semi-scriptural and oft-times unethical teachings and doctrines of the late Medieval Church and how Luther addressed them. A cast of scholars and church leaders share their expertise on the cultural and religious milieu in which Luther operated.

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  • Christian History Magazine #120: Calvin, Councils, and Confessions $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #120: Calvin, Councils, and Confessions

    • Magazine
    • 2016
    • 55 Pages

    A few decades after Luther's stand for reform spread across Europe, a quiet scholarly priest made a fateful stop in Geneva. Read John Calvin's story along with the story of the divisions, martyrdoms, victories, and disappointments that marked the last half of the sixteenth century in this third issue in the Reformation series of Christian History.

    Details
  • Reformation Fold-Out Timeline $2.00

    Reformation Fold-Out Timeline

    • Other
    • 2016
    • Christian History Institute

    The most important events from a century of reform. Unfolds to 11'' x 31''.

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  • Reformation Overview Full Length Dramas Plus Zwingli and Calvin Documentary $29.99

    Reformation Overview Full Length Dramas Plus Zwingli and Calvin Documentary

    • DVD
    • All
    • Documentary
    • 7 hours

    This collection includes the five full-length dramas of John Wycliffe, Martin Luther, God's Outlaw, John Hus, The Radicals and the 30 minute documentary of Zwingli and Calvin.

    Details
  • A Man Named Martin $14.99

    A Man Named Martin

    • DVD
    • All
    • Documentary
    • 80 Minutes
    • 2015

    The life of Martin Luther is one of resolute conviction and steadfast faith. This documentary will examine the life and teaching of this great reformer. The program gives important historical background and explains the key doctrines expounded by Luther: With tenacity and bravery, Martin Luther inspired a Reformation that reverberates throughout the centuries.

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  • Torchlighter New Release Bundle $28.99

    Torchlighter New Release Bundle

    • DVD
    • 2014-2016
    • All
    • 120 Minutes
    • Christian History Institute

    Learn more about John Wesley, Robert Jermain Thomas, and Martin Luther in this bundle of Torchlighter DVDs!

    Details
  • Torchlighters: The Martin Luther Story $12.99

    Torchlighters: The Martin Luther Story

    • DVD
    • 2016
    • Animation
    • 30 Minutes
    • All
    • Christian History Institute

    Share the story of Martin Luther, father of the Reformation, with children through this episode of the Torchlighters! Celebrate the 500th anniversary of the Reformation by learning with Luther that salvation comes by faith.

    Details
  • Reformation Dramas - 5-DVD Pack $29.99

    Reformation Dramas - 5-DVD Pack

    • DVD
    • 400 Minutes
    • Drama
    • All
    • Various
    • Christian History Institute

    This 5-DVD pack includes John Wycliffe: The Morning Star, God's Outlaw, Martin Luther, The Radicals, and John Hus.

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  • This Changed Everything - Special Two-Disc Set $25.00

    This Changed Everything - Special Two-Disc Set

    • DVD
    • 180 Minutes
    • Documentary
    • All
    • 2016
    • Christian History Institute

    This Changed Everything: 500 Years of the Reformation celebrates the fruits of the Reformation while exploring difficult questions about the cost of division: Could schism have been avoided? Is there hope for reunification? What did Jesus really mean when He prayed for His followers to be "one"? This special two disc set includes the three hour series and over five hours of bonus material. Downloadable PDF guide included on DVD!

    Details
  • Reformation Eight Pack $25.00

    Reformation Eight Pack

    • Magazine
    • 1983-2017
    • Christian History Institute

    This special bundle includes eight printed copies of CHM issues about the Reformation. Order 10 or more, and the price will adjust to $20 per eight pack in your cart!

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  • Christian History Magazine #118: The People's Reformation $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #118: The People's Reformation

    • Magazine
    • 2016
    • 51 Pages
    • Christian History Institute

    It didn’t take long for the ideas of Luther, Zwingli, and many others to ignite a sea change in society at large: peasants revolting, priests and nuns marrying, church art destroyed, heretics on both sides persecuted by church and state, and a philandering king whose search for a male heir would birth the Church of England. Read about one of the most turbulent eras of all of history in issue #118, The People’s Reformation, the second in our Reformation series.

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  • Christian History Magazine #116: 25 Writings that Changed the Church and the World $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #116: 25 Writings that Changed the Church and the World

    • Magazine
    • 2015
    • 47 Pages
    • Christian History Institute

    The Bible is the most important Christian book (collection of books actually), but it’s not the only Christian book. This issue of Christian History features the fascinating stories behind the top 25 writings in Church history, selected by more than 70 past writers of the magazine. From Augustine and Aquinas to Bonhoeffer and Barth, this is a veritable primer on what to read, why to read it, and how we got it.

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  • Christian History Magazine #115: Martin Luther and the Reformation $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #115: Martin Luther and the Reformation

    • Magazine
    • 2015
    • 55 Pages

    The first issue of Christian History magazine's series of four on the Reformation explores the roots and fruits of reform. On a quiet October Wednesday in 1517, a young Augustinian monk and theology professor, with one nail to the Wittenberg Castle door, struck a death blow to medieval Catholicism. That’s the story we think we know of Martin Luther, his 95 Theses, and the beginning of the Reformation. But is it the whole story?

    Details
  • Luther: His Life, His Path, His Legacy $15.99

    Luther: His Life, His Path, His Legacy

    • DVD
    • 90 Minutes
    • All
    • Docu-Drama

    Using stunning dramatic footage from the 2003 theatrical film "Luther", starring Joseph Fiennes, this documentary gives a comprehensive overview of the great reformer's life and legacy.

    Details
  • Christian History Magazine #95 - Gospel According to JS Bach $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #95 - Gospel According to JS Bach

    • Magazine
    • 2007
    • Christian History

    *LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE!* Christian History Magazine #95 featuring the Gospel according to JS Bach.

    Details
  • Christian History Magazine #94 - Building the City of God in a Crumbling World $5.00

    Christian History Magazine #94 - Building the City of God in a Crumbling World

    • Magazine
    • 2007
    • Christian History

    *LIMITED QUANTITIES AVAILABLE!* Christian History Magazine featuring Building the City of God in a Crumbling World

    Details
  • Where Luther Walked $15.99

    Where Luther Walked

    • DVD
    • 30 Minutes
    • Documentary
    • All
    • 1982
    • Charthouse Learning Corp.

    How did Martin Luther, who sought only the quiet of monastery, become a pivotal figure in Western history? Why did he object so strongly to indulgences? How did Gutenberg's new printing press spread his influence? Who did Luther marry? How did he respond when his young daughter died in his arms?

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  • Morning Star Of Wittenberg: Life of Katie Luther $11.99

    Morning Star Of Wittenberg: Life of Katie Luther

    • DVD
    • 27 Minutes
    • Documentary
    • All
    • 2001
    • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

    An in-depth look at the life of the woman who helped Luther change the course of history. We learn how she coped with incredible demands and survived the continual onslaught of unpredictable developments. We see how she became a capable manager carrying major responsibilities with and for her famous husband.

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  • Opening The Door To Luther $11.99

    Opening The Door To Luther

    • DVD
    • 30 Minutes
    • Documentary
    • All
    • 2001
    • Evangelical Lutheran Church in America

    Open the door to Martin Luther with public television travel host Rick Steves. He takes us to areas of Germany known as Lutherlands. We see how this Augustinian monk, who most wanted the quiet of a religious life, was thrust into the center of 16th-century world-shaking events.

    Details
  • History Of Christianity - With PDFs $19.99

    History Of Christianity - With PDFs

    • DVD
    • 159 Minutes
    • Documentary
    • All
    • 2000
    • Samford University

    This is a survey course designed to further stimulate your curiosity by providing glimpses of some of the pivotal events in the spread Christianity and sketches of great Christian figures who have significantly affected Christian history thereby shaping the history of the world.

    Details
  • Reformation Overview (W/ PDFs) $19.99

    Reformation Overview (W/ PDFs)

    • DVD
    • 160 Minutes
    • Drama
    • All
    • 1995
    • Christian History Institute

    This series covers the key reformers: John Wycliffe, John Hus, Martin Luther, Ulrich Zwingli, John Calvin, The Anabaptists, and William Tyndale. Includes curriculum in pdf.

    Details
  • Here I Stand: Martin Luther $15.99

    Here I Stand: Martin Luther

    • DVD
    • 2002
    • All
    • T. N. Mohan

    It is claimed that there have been more books written about Martin Luther than anyone else other than Jesus Christ. He is one of those few who can be proclaimed indisputably a "hinge of history."

    Details
  • Martin Luther $11.99

    Martin Luther

    • DVD
    • 105 Minutes
    • Drama
    • All
    • 2002
    • Lutheran Film Associates

    The dramatic black and white classic film of Martin Luther's life made in the 1950s.

    Details