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Christian History

Onesimus Nesib

It Happened Today: A Stroke for Bible Translator Onesimus Nesib (1931)

Rescued from slavery, Onesimus Nesib dreamed big for his people.

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Daily Meditations

Devotional (2016 church year): Reflect on the Priesthood (1868)

Truly I tell you, whatever you bind on earth will bee bound in heaven, and...

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1846

Death of Isaac McCoy, a missionary to American Indians. McCoy and his family had endured great privation and hardship in their pioneer life. He had been criticized for urging the transfer of Indians from their ancestral lands, but his writings show he was concerned they were being corrupted by contact with whites.

Authority for the date:

Standard encyclopedias.

1837

Angelina Grimké addresses a large “mixed” audience of men and women in Boston, Massachusetts, the onset of bringing many women into active participation in the movement to abolish slavery, but also conclusively repulsing gender discrimination in her lectures.

Authority for the date:

http://www.gilderlehrman.org/history-by-era/slavery-and-anti-slavery/essays/angelina-and-sarah-grimke-abolitionist-sisters&a

1834

Cyrus McCormick, a Christian inventor and businessman from Virginia, patents the world’s first truly workable reaper. He will make a fortune from it, much of which will go to charity.

Authority for the date:

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org.

1691

John Flavel, a godly pastor in Dartmouth, England, preaches his last sermon, taking as his text 1 Corinthians 10: 12 “Wherefore let him that stands take heed lest he fall,” urging those who are careless of their Christian profession to show a deeper concern for their souls. He had written books urging full committment to Christ and was known for his passion in prayer. For instance, once learning that a sea battle was in progress and knowing that many Dartmouth boys were in the navy, he led his people in prayer and fasting. Not one of Dartmouth’s many sailors died.

Authority for the date:

Citation lost.

1663

The men of Groton, Massachusetts, vote to make Samuel Willard their pastor “for as long as he lives.” Several years later an Indian raid will destroy the town and Willard will move to Boston where he will rise in prominence.

Authority for the date:

Van Dyken, Seymour. Samuel Willard, 1640-1707. Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1972.

1579

Francis Fletcher, chaplain to Sir Francis Drake, reads from the Anglican Book of Common Prayer somewhere in California on “the first Sunday after Trinity”—the first time the English prayer book is known to have been used in the New World. A number of Indians gather to watch. Captain Drake's rough sailors, who have just plundered their way up the Spanish coast, lift their hands to heaven and pray God to open the eyes of the Indian idolaters “to the knowledge of him and of Jesus Christ the salvation of the Gentiles.”

Authority for the date:

Drake, Francis (from notes by Francis Fletcher etc). The World Encompassed. London: Nicholas Bovrne, 1628.

431

When they discover that Patriarch Cyril of Alexandria intends to open the Council of Ephesus without waiting for the arrival of Patriarch John of Antioch, who is supposed to be its president (John has been delayed by flooding), bishops of the East sign a formal act demanding delay. Cyril will ignore them and condemn Patriarch Nestorius of Constantinople because of his christology and order John to break communion with him.

Authority for the date:

Wace, Henry. A Dictionary of Christian Biography and Literature to the End of the Sixth Century A.D.