Christian History Institute

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Christian History

Ramabai with Widows

It Happened Today: Revival in Pandita Ramabai’s Community (1905)

What prompted hundreds of women to begin confessing their sins at once?

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Aids to Reflection

Devotional (2016 church year): Contrast God’s Righteousness with Peoples’ (1843)

For I say to you that unless your righteousness surpasses that of the...

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1997

Luis Bush, a mission strategist who in 1989 had coined the term “10/40 Window,” serves as senior consultant to GCOWE ’97 (Global Consultation on World Evangelization) which is held in Pretoria, South Africa. The 10/40 Window refers to the region located between 10 degrees and 40 degrees north of the equator, a general area that has a high level of socioeconomic challenges and little access to the Christian gospel.

Authority for the date:

http://www.ad2000.org/staff/luis.htm

1971

Death of Rosa Jinsey Young, an African American educator from Alabama whose work founding schools for her people was supported by the Lutheran Church, Missouri Synod.

Authority for the date:

Encyclopedia of Alabama.

1892
Joseph Parker (author of the commentary known as the People’s Bible) holds his one thousandth Thursday noon service. Authority for the date: Adamson, William. Life of Joseph Parker: Pastor of City Temple. London, New York: Revell, 1902.
1882

Repose (death) of Bishop Nestor of San Francisco and Alaska. The Orthodox bishop had been active and dedicated to his people, overseeing translation of the Bible into the Eskimo language and making extensive visitations throughout his see. He died falling into the sea from the deck of a ship while returning from one of these strenuous journeys.

Authority for the date:

http://oca.org

1860

Bishop Samuel Wilberforce and biologist Thomas Huxley engage in a famous exchange regarding evolution. Before the debate, Wilberforce was coached by biologist Richard Owen.

Authority for the date:

Standard encyclopedias.

1839

Death of Johan Olof Wallin, Archbishop of Uppsala, Sweden’s best-known hymn writer of that era. Among his hymns are “We Worship You, O God of Might” and “Christians, While on Earth Abiding.”

Authority for the date:

Cyberhymnal.

1688

After deliberating all night, a jury acquits seven bishops who refused to sign King James II of England’s “Declaration for Liberty of Conscience.” The seven had been held in the tower of London on a charge of seditious libel for declaring that Parliament, not the king, had power to make such a grant. The names of the seven are Sancroft, Archbishop of Canterbury; Lloyd, Bishop of St. Asaph; Ken of Bath and Wells, Turner of Ely; Lake of Chichester; White of Peterborough; and Trelawney of Exeter.

Authority for the date:

Standard encyclopedias.

1637

William Prynne, an outspoken and dogmatic Puritan, is pilloried in company with Henry Burton and John Bastwick. Prynne’s ears are cropped and he is branded with the letters “S.L.,” standing for “Seditious Libeler.” On his way back to prison, he writes some Latin verses claiming the S.L. stands for stigmata laudis (a pun meaning either “sign of praise,” or “sign of Laud”—Archbishop William Laud is his main persecutor).

Authority for the date:

Standard encyclopedias.

1607

Death of Cesar Baronius in Rome. He had been a leading Roman Catholic historian.

Authority for the date:

New Schaff-Herzog Encyclopedia of Religious Knowledge.

1548

The Interim of Augsburg, a temporary measure pending a church council, becomes imperial law within the Holy Roman Empire. Although it orders Protestants to adopt Roman Catholic forms and doctrine, it concedes the right of Protestant clergy to marry and the laity to receive both bread and wine.

Authority for the date:

Standard encyclopedias.